Majority of Torontonians believe a rideshare freeze will only make life more difficult and more expensive.

We surveyed Torontonians on their views about city council’s new freeze on rideshare drivers in the city. This survey was commissioned and paid for by Uber Canada.

Download a PDF copy of the full report here.

Top takeaways

  • A majority of Torontonians are concerned about increased wait times and increased prices as a result of the new freeze on rideshare drivers.
  • Most Torontonians believe a freeze will only make life more difficult and more expensive (58%) and that it will hit working and lower income people the hardest (59%).
  • Of all the issues we tested (11 issues), regulating rideshare companies came in last in terms of Torontonians’ issue priority. Only 3% put the issue in their top-3, and 77% would prefer that City Council focus on more important issues.

Results

A new poll of 675 Toronto adults by Pluriel Research finds that a majority of Torontonians are concerned about the impact of a rideshare freeze on wait times (64%) and prices (72%). And while 40% of Torontonians are aware of city council’s freeze on licenses for rideshare drivers, 77% would prefer that council focused on more important issues.

The poll, commissioned and paid for by Uber Canada, was delivered online from Oct 13 – 16, 2023, the margin-of-error for an equivalently sized probability sample is +/- 3.8%.

“When it comes to a rideshare freeze, most Torontonians are concerned about wait times and prices. That’s an important consideration when cost-of-living in the city is dominating headlines,” said Gabe De Roche, CEO of Pluriel Research. “Torontonians just don’t think a rideshare freeze should be a priority for their city council. More than three-quarters of them would rather have council focus on other, more important priorities like housing and economic issues.”

Concern about impact on wait times and prices

Nearly two-thirds (64%) of Torontonians are concerned about the freeze’s impact on wait times. Concern is highest among those who use rideshare apps at least monthly, but we also find an age gap with younger Torontonians (18 to 34) much more likely to be concerned (82%) than older Torontonians.

When it comes to price increases, concern is even higher (72% concerned, vs. 64% for wait times). As with wait times, we find a similar age gap, with 89% of younger Torontonians concerned about price increases as a result of the freeze.

Other impacts of a freeze

Nearly 6-in-10 Torontonians (57%) agree that a freeze will only make life more difficult and more expensive. Across every subgroup of respondents we tested, there is net agreement that the freeze will make life more difficult and more expensive: across ideology, income group, age group, and those who approve or disapprove of the Mayor’s performance.

Similarly, nearly 6-in-10 Torontonians (59%) expect the impacts of a freeze to hit working people and lower income people especially hard. This includes a majority (52%) among those who say they voted for Mayor Olivia Chow.

Issue priority

Among all the issues we tested, regulating rideshare companies tested the lowest when it comes to setting priorities for the city. Only 3% of Torontonians consider regulating rideshare to be among their top-3 issues. Housing affordability was cited as the most important issue, followed by homelessness and economic issues.

When asked directly if imposing a freeze on rideshare drivers should be a priority for Council, 77% of Torontonians say they should be focused on other, more pressing issues.

Awareness of driver freeze

4-in-10 Torontonians are aware of the new freeze on rideshare drivers. Among monthly users of rideshare, awareness is at 44% (compared to 56% unaware).

Methodology

This survey was conducted online from October 13 to 16, 2023, with a sample size of 675 adults (18+) residing in Toronto (postal codes beginning with “M”). Respondents were recruited from a blend of online panel providers to maximize representativeness. Sample imbalances were minimized through the use of quota sampling on age and gender, and post-stratification survey weights were applied to correct for any remaining observable sample imbalance. The margin-of-error for an equivalently sized probability sample is +/- 3.8% (19 times out of 20). Margins-of-error for subgroups are larger commensurate with their share of the population. Reported percentages may not always add to 100 due to rounding.

This survey was commissioned and paid for by Uber Canada.

Full crosstabs are available on request. Please contact us at hello@plurielresearch.com to schedule a walkthrough.